They’re Gone

From the time I first moved here in 2009, the Confederate statues have disturbed and offended me, along with many others, natives and visitors alike. Now all four have finally been removed. It’s a good thing and it makes New Orleans a better place.

• • •

The League of the South

In case you were wondering what sorts of boobs would drive eight hours to New Orleans to “defend” the Robert E. Lee and Jeff Davis statues, one of the groups prominently featured in news coverage of today’s opposing demonstrations was a quaint little heritage society called the League of the South. What the TV coverage didn’t explain about the League, you can read at the SPLC’s profile of the group — their cheeky call for Southern secession from the United States, their charming demand for “Anglo-Celtic cultural dominance,” their adorable annual celebration of John Wilkes Booth, who “knew a man who needed killing when he saw him,” or their helpful, civic-minded warning to “never underestimate the perfidy of the organized Jew.”

• • •

The Coming Voter Suppression Efforts

Donald Trump’s recent claim that 3 to 5 million people voted illegally for his opponent in the election is patently, ridiculously, offensively untrue. Its absurdity is so great that it requires no refutation. You know this, I know this, and believe me, Donald Trump and his advisors know this. But the truth value of the claim is not really the point.

• • •

Thanks, Obama (seriously)

There’s two kinds of charisma — one is the bad kind, the charisma of the narcissist or sociopath. These are the people who live to manipulate and use others, and so they develop A+ talents for appealing to peoples’ desires and expectations.

• • •

Honor

It occurred to me while watching tonight’s debate that the consistent thread with Donald is that he is a man utterly without honor.

• • •

Emily St. John Mandel, Station Eleven

Station ElevenThis is a beautiful, elegiac, heartbreakingly sad novel of the post-apocalyptic genre, that transcends the usual preoccupations we have about the End of the World and weaves meditations on fame, regret, culture, and human relationships throughout its 333 elegantly written pages.

• • •
1 2 3 13